Straddle Milling

       When two or more parallel vertical surfaces are machined at a single cut, the operation is called straddle milling. Straddle milling is accomplished by mounting two side milling cutters on the same arbor, set apart at an exact spacing. Two sides of the workpiece are machined simultaneously and final width dimensions are exactly controlled.

      Straddle milling has many useful applications introduction machining. Parallel slots of equal depth can be milled by using straddle mills of equal diameters. Figure 8-29 illustrates a typical example of straddle milling. In this case a hexagon is being cut, but the same operation may be applied to cutting squares or splines on the end of a cylindrical workpiece. The workpiece is usually mounted between centers in the indexing fixture or mounted vertically in a swivel vise. The two side milling cutters are separated by spacers, washers, and shims so that the distance between the cutting teeth of each cutter is exactly equal to the width of the workpiece area required. When cutting a square by this method, two opposite sides of the square are cut, and then the spindle of the indexing fixture or the swivel vise is rotated 90°, and the other two sides of the workpiece are straddle milled.

 

Figure 4-29. Straddle milling.

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